<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1278365425520819&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

SUBSCRIBE TO THE BLOG Get the latest information on a variety of health and wellness topics to keep your family healthy and stay informed.

Healthy Living Blog

The Types of Diabetes: How to Manage Them After a Diagnosis

November 09, 2017 | Fisher-Titus Healthy Living Team

SHARE

types of diabetesDiabetes is a group of diseases that make up the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. It develops when your blood sugar is too high. Although they all cause high blood sugar levels, several different types of diabetes can affect you.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 10% of the U.S. population has diabetes. Only China and India have more adults living with diabetes than the United States. That number does not include the more than 7 million people who are undiagnosed.

Here’s a look at the different types of diabetes and their causes, symptoms and treatments.

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way your body processes blood sugar (glucose). It accounts for 90 to 95% of all diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes starts as insulin resistance. This means your body can’t use insulin efficiently. It used to be called "adult-onset diabetes” because it is often diagnosed later in life.

What Causes It?

Although the exact cause is unknown, contributing factors may include genetics, lack of exercise and being overweight.

What are the Symptoms?

The range of symptoms you may experience with type 2 diabetes include:

  • Excessive hunger
  • Excessive thirst
  • Fatigue
  • Weight gain
  • Frequent urination
  • Blurred vision

How is It Treated?

You have a number of options to manage your diabetes. Your doctor will recommend lifestyle changes first. You’ll be asked to change your diet and get more exercise. A common practice would also be to start you on diabetes medication like Biguanides. And because diabetes medication seems to help the body use insulin better, you may be asked to take them along with insulin shots.

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. It’s also known as juvenile diabetes because it is most commonly diagnosed in 10- to 14-year-olds, but can be diagnosed at any age.

What Causes It?

The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Typically your body's own immune system — which normally fights harmful bacteria and viruses — mistakenly destroys the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas.

What Are the Symptoms?

Symptoms of type 1 diabetes include:

  • Excessive thirst
  • Fatigue
  • Hunger
  • Sweating
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Excessive urination
  • Headache
  • Blurred vision

How is It Treated?

If you’re diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you’ll require lifelong insulin therapy. You may even need two or more injections of insulin per day. Your doses may be adjusted on the basis of self-monitoring of blood glucose levels.

Prediabetes

If your blood sugar is high, but not high enough to be type 2 diabetes, you’re considered to have prediabetes.This is a wake-up call that you’re on the path to diabetes. Approximately 1 in 3 American adults has prediabetes.

What Causes It?

If you have prediabetes, the cells in your body aren’t responding normally to insulin. Your pancreas tries to compensate by making more insulin to get the cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes—and type 2 diabetes down the road.

What are the Symptoms?

  • Excessive hunger
  • Frequent urination
  • Excessive thirst
  • Fatigue
  • Weight gain

How is It Treated?

A simple blood test will let you know if you have prediabetes, and if you do, your doctor will recommend lifestyle changes. You may be asked to eat a plant-based diet and to begin exercising regularly. Learning stress management techniques may also help you turn things around.

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy. About 3 out of 5 pregnant women have the disease.

What Causes It?

The many changes in your body during pregnancy may predispose you to insulin resistance.

What are the Symptoms?

There are no noticeable signs or symptoms. Your doctor diagnoses gestational diabetes with a blood test.

How is It Treated?

You’ll have to monitor your blood sugar, maintain a healthy diet, exercise, and monitor your baby. You may be asked to take medication if your blood sugar is too high.

If you’d like more information on how to manage diabetes, contact us today  to schedule an appointment. With a little guidance and effort, you can control your blood sugar levels—and your life.

Find a Physician

COMMENTS